Sushi Tetsu

http://sushitetsu.co.uk/

Scores: 4 GFG

I hate places that are difficult to book: Sushi Tetsu and Dabbous are two very different restaurants which I have been to recently but they share a trait, they are the two hardest restaurants in London to get a reservation for.  In Sushi Tetsu’s case, one of the reasons for this is that it is a simple sushi bar that has only 7 seats.  The restaurant is in Clerkenwell hidden down an alley around the corner from the Zetter Hotel.IMG_0596

On this occasion I did not order omaksee in advance and thus had to order when I got there, I started with a sashimi selection.  This comprised of two pieces each of tuna, salmon, sea bass and shrimp.  These were all excellent quality fish.  The salmon was particularly good. The other highlight here is that the chef uses freshly grated wasabi, this makes a real difference as it has a much better fragrance and flavour than the fake wasabi we are so used to.  It is a massive pity more places in London don’t use it as it seems to be worth the extra expense.

IMG_0593

I then ordered some pieces of sushi, I asked for mackerel, yellowtail and toro, although the chef said that he only had medium fatty tuna. All three of these were great, the hand formed rice was just the right temperate and there was a perfect amount of vinegar in the rice and wasabi on top. Again the quality of the fish was top notch. I let the chef suggest three other pieces of sushi. The first of these was a razor clam which had a surprising sweetness and also a hit of salt to it (added or from soy).  This was very good and is definitely something I would order again.  Scallop had been scored and torched and was just lovely.  A final piece consisted of squid with sea urchin; this was good as it was a great combination of flavours and I find sea urchin to be a bit much on its own.

Scallop

I ordered some rolls as a final dish; the chef selected razor clam with cucumber again these were very tasty.  This, in my opinion, is clearly the best sushi in London and thus it is perhaps unsurprising that it is also probably the hardest restaurant to get into in London.  If you want to go, prepare yourself for a long time waiting on the phone with little hope of getting though and less chance of finding an available table when you do.  It is worth it when you succeed though!

4/ 5
Sushi Tetsu on Urbanspoon

 squid with sea urchin

squid with sea urchin

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5 thoughts on “Sushi Tetsu

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  2. Hello, I have managed to secure a reservation for the restaurant and I was trying to debate of whether to do like most and go for the Omakase or whether to order straight from the menu. How was your experience? How much did you spend? (to compare prices)

    I am taking my girlfriend there by surprise for her birthday and I want to know which one could be the best option.

    Thanks in advance!

    • I would say that I have been been very impressed by the omakase in the past which I think is now either £60 or £80 a head depending on the number of dishes, you can’t really go too wrong with it as long as you are happy to eat most things. To be fair you can get out with a smaller bill by going ALC- I think for the time I posted about the bill was a bit over £50 including service and drinks for a decent amount of food for lunch.

      I think it is important if you go ALC to have some idea of what you like, although also do not be afraid to ask the chef what is good at the moment. If money is tight at the moment the ALC may suit better, on the other hand it is so hard to get into maybe it is best to try and splash out on an omakase as it could be a one off special meal.

      Overall you can’t go wrong either way so no matter what decision you make I am sure you will have a great time.

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  4. Pingback: Sushi Tetsu (large sashmi and sushi omaksee) | Restaurants and Rants

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